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Local company may hold solution for Muskrat Lake

By Tina Peplinskie, OBSERVER MULTIMEDIA JOURNALIST

Kevin Bossy of Eganville’s Bishop Water Technologies Inc. recently made a presentation to Whitewater Region council about his proposed biofilm treatment pilot project to assist with the algae problem in Muskrat Lake. For more community photos, please visit out website photo gallery at www.thedailyobserver.ca.

Kevin Bossy of Eganville’s Bishop Water Technologies Inc. recently made a presentation to Whitewater Region council about his proposed biofilm treatment pilot project to assist with the algae problem in Muskrat Lake. For more community photos, please visit out website photo gallery at www.thedailyobserver.ca.

COBDEN - 

Council has endorsed a pilot project being proposed by a local company to assist with the algae problem in the Muskrat River and other water bodies in the municipality.

Kevin Bossy of Eganville’s Bishop Water Technologies Inc. made a presentation to Whitewater council last week about his biofilm treatment plan for polluted rivers. While he wasn’t looking for money, he was looking for support in principle of the project going forward.

The local company has made a name for itself in its methods of treating waste water, using pioneering technologies such as geotubing, the process the Eganville pollution control plant has been successfully using to reduce its biosolids since 2008.

The pilot project is intended to look at water bodies that feed into the Muskrat Lake and target areas with high levels of nutrients. While the biofilm polymer would not be placed in the lake, it would be situated where the other bodies of water or areas of drainage such as municipal drains, ditches, and farmers fields feed into the lake, to act as a filter. He anticipated two or three locations where there is a significant nutrient load would be selected for the pilot.

He feels the instances that could be causing the issues, such as development on the lake and farmers can’t be changed so he intends to start work in mitigating the nutrient load using that fact as a baseline.

The company has completed a wastewater pilot project to purify water in Asia and from his initial research Bossy believes he has enough evidence to show it will work for the Muskrat and Snake Rivers. The goal is to prove this technology would work at home as well as abroad, he said.

There is funding available, with a deadline to submit applications by today, which Bossy intended on meeting.

Demonstrating the municipality and other stakeholders are interested in the project are the key, according to Bossy. Mayor Jim Labow and the rest of council agreed it would be beneficial to support the project as the issues in Muskrat Lake aren’t going to go away.

The long-term goal is the creation of a steering committee or Friends of Muskrat Lake group that could oversee the project and future solutions.

Tina Peplinskie is a Daily Observer multimedia journalist

tina.peplinskie@sunmedia.ca

 


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