Sports Other Sports

Petawawa soldier heading to Military World Games

By Sean Chase, The Daily Observer

SEAN CHASE/DAILY OBSERVER
Experienced triathlete Sgt. Marc Prud'homme will be representing Canada when he competes at the 2015 Military World Games in Mungyeong, South Korea in October. A member of the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, Sgt. Prud'homme has been in more than 30 world championships during his athletic career.

SEAN CHASE/DAILY OBSERVER Experienced triathlete Sgt. Marc Prud'homme will be representing Canada when he competes at the 2015 Military World Games in Mungyeong, South Korea in October. A member of the 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, Sgt. Prud'homme has been in more than 30 world championships during his athletic career.

GARRISON PETAWAWA - 

A Petawawa soldier will be calling on all his experience as a devoted triathlete when he competes for Canada on the world stage next month.

While Sgt. Marc Prud'homme has had his sights set on the iconic Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, he is ready to go up against personnel from other nations in the 2015 Military World Games at Mungyeong, South Korea in the triathlon.

“Triathlon is a very individual sport,” said the 33-year-old infantryman who serves with Oscar Company, 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. “Everybody's got the same goal in mind and that is to be really fast at the end. Whether you win or lose everyone is cheering each other on.”

During the summer, Sgt. Prud'homme has been vigorously training with the Canadian Armed Forces Long Distance Triathlon Team. Alongside members from other bases, including Capt. David Lacombe, Cpl. Alex Boule, Capt. Sarah Graves, Lt.-Cdr. David Dallin, Maj. Martin Lamontagne-Lacasse, Maj. Eric Travis, Cpl. Catherine Desmarais, Capt. Lesley Quinlan, Maj. John Timmermans, Cdr. Lucie Tremblay, Capt. Philippe Reynolds, and Capt. David Simpkin, he puts in days that required the team to bike 130 kilometres, swim two kilometres and run a further eight kilometres.

When they enter the worlds, hosted by the Conseil internationale du sport militaire - International Military Sports Council, on Oct. 10, it will be a challenging course that requires them to swim 1.5 kilometres, bike 40 kilometres and run a further 10 kilometres. As a strong swimmer, Sgt Prud'homme's role will be to act as the team's anchor in the water and make life difficult for their opponents.

“I try to be in front of the fastest swimmer and try to slow them down,” added Sgt. Prud'homme. “It's a technique we adopted to control the speed in the front and very often they don't realize what is happening.”

The Military World Games, which promotes friendship between soldiers from all over the world through sports, is the third largest international event after the Olympics and Universiad. More than 9,000 people from 110 nations will be competing.

“I know I am not going over there and winning the race,” said Sgt. Prud'homme. “I like the fact that it is teamwork and we are representing our country.”

The triathlete will use the worlds as a true test of his abilities. It will also cap a comeback of sorts. Three years ago he was instructing at a development camp at Trenton, Ontario when he crashed his bike into a bridge.

“My entire bike rolled around and crushed into pieces,” he recalled.

Suffering a crack jaw, cuts and bruises, he also required reconstructive surgery on his left shoulder. Nevertheless, he continued swimming and biking while his arm was in a sling.

“I'm back to 100 per cent if not better,” he said.

Over his sporting career, Sgt. Prud'homme has been to world-class competitions 30 times, multiple Army Runs and triathlons and Canadian Forces national championships. Earlier this year, he won three bronze medals in a military championship hosted by France. The Canadian team recently finished 19th at the U.S. Military Triathlon Championships in Chicago.

As it has been a busy year already, Sgt. Prud'homme is looking forward to the end of the season. However, while achieving best results is critical, enjoying the racing experience is equally important.

“In an Olympic distance, the challenge and the intensity is really high so you don't have time to cheer each other but you can see it in the eyes of another person as you are passing them,” he said.

You can follow Sgt. Marc Prud'homme and his race results at www.marcprudhommeathlete.com.

sean.chase@sunmedia.ca