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Adventures in engineering and science

By Celina Ip

The University of Ottawa's Adventures in Engineering and Science brought their outreach program to the Boys and Girls Club of Pembroke's summer camp from Aug. 14 to 18. Pictured here, camp facilitator Troy Martin tests out one of the crash test cars crafted by a team of campers.

The University of Ottawa's Adventures in Engineering and Science brought their outreach program to the Boys and Girls Club of Pembroke's summer camp from Aug. 14 to 18. Pictured here, camp facilitator Troy Martin tests out one of the crash test cars crafted by a team of campers.

The Boys and Girls Club’s summer camp were visited by the University of Ottawa’s Adventures in Science and Engineering (AES).

 

AES is University of Ottawa’s summer camp program that invites youth and teenagers to learn about science and engineering through experimentation and fun. Along with the camp sessions hosted at the university, AES provides outreach programs to camps located in aboriginal, rural and low-income communities.

From Aug. 14 to 18, AES provided their outreach program to the Boys and Girls Club of Pembroke, with all expenses covered by Actua – a Canadian charitable organization that delivers science, engineering and technology educational programs to young people in Canada.

Facilitated by University of Ottawa science students Troy Martin and Colleen Coady, nearly 80 kids – aged six to 13 years old – participated in the week-long camp that focused on fun and educational S.T.E.M.-themed (science, technology, engineering, math) experiments and activities.

Participants built crash test cars, bottle rockets, experimented with 3D printing and made paper airplanes to learn about the physics of flying, among other activities.

“For the crash test cars, we give them a bunch of materials to complete this challenge where they need to design a crash test car that will protect a real egg as it goes down a ramp and into a barrier – with the egg still intact at the end,” said Martin.

Martin expressed that the outreach program aims to showcase the fun and exciting aspects of science and engineering to youth who wouldn’t otherwise have those opportunities.

“I was in low-income camps when I was a kid so I know how much it means to these kids that have these opportunities to be exposed to science and engineering,” said Martin. “For some of these kids, this will give them that spark that will help them to realize that 'hey, this is what I want to do with my life'. I've seen that a few times where kids will come up to me and say 'I now want to be a scientist' or 'I now want to be an engineer' and it feels so cool to be able to be a part of that.”

cip@postmedia.com