News Local

Cobden serves up Taste of the Valley

By Celina Ip

Ottawa Farmer's Market was stationed at this year's Taste of the Valley in Cobden, with a number of fresh organic fruits and vegetables available. Pictured here, Ottawa Farmer's Market's Kenroy Cameron holds up two colourful bundles of carrots.

Ottawa Farmer's Market was stationed at this year's Taste of the Valley in Cobden, with a number of fresh organic fruits and vegetables available. Pictured here, Ottawa Farmer's Market's Kenroy Cameron holds up two colourful bundles of carrots.

PEMBROKE - 

COBDEN – For the 10th annual year, Cobden served up a Taste of the Valley.

 

Despite the rainy weather, the popular autumn festival attracted more than 4,000 attendees who took over the Cobden Fairgrounds from early morning until late afternoon on Saturday.

“We always seem to draw a crowd regardless of the weather. One year it was pouring buckets, the next year it was super cold but it is one of these events that people wait for and attend no matter what,” said Joy Curry, president of the Cobden Farmers Market and lead organizer of this location’s Taste of the Valley. “This is the event where they do a lot of their Christmas shopping for their preserves and Christmas presents and it's one of those must-go-to events in the Valley and we're happy to have everyone here.”

The grounds and all of the buildings were crowded with tents and tables showcasing the talents of more than 100 vendors were were coming from all parts of Renfrew County and as far as Ottawa.

Local farmers were selling organic fruits and vegetables, bakers had whipped up a variety of decadent treats, cooks had crafted an array of savoury dishes, and local crafters and artisans were selling all kinds of beautiful handmade soaps, decorative trinkets, jewellery and other odds and ends to appease all interests.

While strolling throughout the grounds, the spectators sampled and savoured all kinds of delightful homemade treats and they got a head-start on their Christmas shopping as they stocked up on all kinds of homemade gifts for family and friends.

Curry said that the event encourages people to ‘shop local’ as it provides them with an opportunity to see all of the unique homemade and homegrown unique products that are available with the Ottawa Valley.

“98 per cent of everything here is all handmade or homegrown, and to me it's phenomenal to have this much local produce and craft talent in this area,” said Curry. “ I believe so much in buying local and I like to promote the fact that it's not a big carbon footprint when you're buying something local that's not been transported in. As well, I appreciate a handmade gift so much more because I know that it's come from the person. Likewise, when you’re buying tomatoes from your local farmers versus grocery store tomatoes, you really taste the difference.”

With 2017 marking the 10th year of the annual festival, Curry expressed that the event has grown leaps and bounds from it’s early days and she continues to be impressed by the large number of spectators and the incredible vendors that it attracts each year.

“I’ve been running this event for the past five years and it's a labour of love,” said Curry.

cip@postmedia.com