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Petawawa Predators host Poppy Meet

By Celina Ip

Petawawa Predators Swim Club executive committee member Andrew O'Connell with his daughter Maaike O'Connell who took part in the mixed 50 metre backstroke, the mixed 100 metre freestyle, the mixed 100 metre backstroke an d the 200 metre freestyle event.

Petawawa Predators Swim Club executive committee member Andrew O'Connell with his daughter Maaike O'Connell who took part in the mixed 50 metre backstroke, the mixed 100 metre freestyle, the mixed 100 metre backstroke an d the 200 metre freestyle event.

PEMBROKE - 

GARRISON PETAWAWA – The Petawawa Predators Swim Club had a stream of success at their annual Poppy Meet and Greet on Nov. 5, fishing out many personal bests.

 

The annual swim meet was dubbed the Poppy Meet four years ago, in honour of Remembrance Day and the swim club’s connection to the armed forces.

“We named it the Poppy Meet to honour Remembrance Day and to show gratitude and reverence for the fact that we swim out of a military facility and we support military families and do that as a community club,” said Chela Breckon, performance coach for the Predators Swim Club.

A total of 59 swimmers aged six to 16, including five from the Deep River Candu Swim Club, hit the Dundonald Hall pool to improve their personal bests.

According to executive committee member Andrew O’Connell, the friendly competition serves as a developmental meet to build upon the young swimmers’ fundamental skills and prepare them for future meets.

“The main reason we have this meet is to serve as a development meet for our younger kids. So we'll have short 25 metre to 50 meter swims for them to participate in and a lot of times this is the first time that the kids have actually been to a meet,” said O’Connell. “We want to have their first meet in their own pool where they feel comfortable and all the noise and whistle blowing is not so scary for them.”

As they expertly dove into the pool and swam back and forth, they displayed fine form and a strong desire to learn and succeed.

Freestyle, butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and individual medley – a combination of all four strokes – were practised, with all races times and duly recorded under the watchful eyes of judges and timekeepers.

“We do this at the beginning of the year because this will give them a baseline of how quickly they can do a certain stroke and then we can track their improvement over the year as they take part in other practices and meets,” said O’Connell.

cip@postmedia.com