Opinion Column

Celebrating Dr. Seuss

By Pembroke Daily Observer

In this May 4, 2017 photo, a mural that features Theodor Seuss Geisel, left, also known by his pen name Dr. Seuss, rests on a wall near an entrance at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum, in Springfield, Mass. The new museum devoted to Dr. Seuss opened on June 3 in his hometown.

In this May 4, 2017 photo, a mural that features Theodor Seuss Geisel, left, also known by his pen name Dr. Seuss, rests on a wall near an entrance at The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum, in Springfield, Mass. The new museum devoted to Dr. Seuss opened on June 3 in his hometown.

“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who’ll decide where to go…”

Friday March 2 marked the 114th anniversary of Dr. Seuss’s birthday.

Around the world, schools, day cares, libraries and other learning centres celebrated by reading some of the most iconic books of our childhood. Local elementary school students dressed up as a Dr. Seuss character, some children wore black with a striped hat, some dressed up in red as Thing one or Thing two, and some even wore orange for the Lorax. Bright colours and rhymes of reading where in abundance at the Library during a drop-in craft in honour of Dr. Seuss. The celebration promotes literacy just like the lines straight out of Dr. Seuss' books. “The more things you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, was an American writer, cartoonist, animator, book publisher and artist best known for writing children's books.

Today, we're celebrating Dr. Seuss with five facts about his life you may not have known:

1.Theodor Seuss Geisel says he adopted the pen name "Dr. Seuss" because he was saving his real name for the Great American Novel he intended to write one day.

2. Dr. Seuss was not a doctor. He briefly studied English literature at Oxford after graduating from Dartmouth, but instead became a cartoonist. In 1955, Dartmouth awarded him an honorary doctorate.

3. Only four of the 44 books Dr. Seuss wrote and illustrated are written in prose.

4. Dr. Seuss wrote "The Cat in the Hat" because he was concerned about kids learning to read. A publisher reportedly challenged him to "Write me a story that first graders can't put down!”

5. Dr. Seuss has received two Emmys, a Peabody award and a Pulitzer Prize.

6. Write a book using 50 words or fewer. That was the bet Dr. Seuss made with his editor Bennett Cerf and the result was Green Eggs and Ham (“I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-Am”).

7. Dr. Seuss is credited for the first person using the word Nerd. He used the word in his book If I Ran the Zoo in 1950.

8. Dr. Seuss's first book was And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was published in 1937. The book was turned down 27 times by publishing companies.

9. His children’s books have been translated into more than 15 languages.

In one way or another Dr. Seuss has made an impact on literature and our lives, whether you grew up reading his books, or you're reading them as an adult to someone now; Dr. Seuss really does test your ability to keep a rhythm while reading, reading words that are made up and reading one word a head of the one your saying, it’s not for the faint of heart. Dr. Seuss is a author that will stand the tests of time and always have a child asking if a Fiffer-feffer-feff or a Yink is real and what kind of sound a Zimbaphone can make. 

Liz Pombiere is the community outreach technician for the Petawawa Public Library.



Featured Businesses

Go to the Marketplace »