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3D printing at the Pembroke Library

By Celina Ip

Pembroke Library assistant Kimberly Mayfield holds up a 3D-printed LEGO ring constructed with the library's Makerbot Replicator 2X Experimental Printer.

Pembroke Library assistant Kimberly Mayfield holds up a 3D-printed LEGO ring constructed with the library's Makerbot Replicator 2X Experimental Printer.

Using 3D printing technology, kids had the chance to see their imaginations come to life.

 

On March 13, a group of 13 kids and teens learned about 3D printing during the Pembroke Public Library’s March Break program.

It was only a year ago that the library purchased the Makerbot Replicator 2Xx Experimental Printer to provide a new and modern type of technology and service – and to show the community that libraries are not just about books anymore.

The library’s printer creates small, plastic objects with fine details. It can be used to create tiny figurines, or something more useful, such as a cellphone holder or a small planter.

Along with utilizing the 3D printer for library programs, patrons are welcome to experiment with the printer on their own time.

During the one-hour March Break session, library assistant Kimberly Mayfield and IT services coordinator Rosalie Laird showcased the library’s 3D printer and gave the participants a brief introduction to 3D modeling, engineering and design.

“Our CEO Karthi wanted library staff to demonstrate the 3D printer to the youth of the community during the March Break, as we previously have held other 3D printing program demonstrations for adults,” said Mayfield. “There were examples of 3D-printed objects to give examples of some possible requests that can be made. We also printed a 3D LEGO ring for the demonstration, after I calibrated the machine.”

Through the 3D printer, Mayfield said that the library is focusing on providing access to tools and experiences on top of the knowledge-based resources traditionally distributed by libraries.

“Everyone was excited to watch the printing, and they started to imagine other 3D printed objects to request us to print for themselves,” said Mayfield. “The kids wanted to know how the machine works, how hot it gets, how to design your own print designs, the printing costs, specifications (how wide and tall an object can be), and how long it takes to print.

For those who are interested in testing out the library’s 3D printer, contact kmayfield@pembrokelibrary.ca or lroy@pembrokelibrary.ca

cip@postmedia.com

 



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